Moderating Negative Facebook Comments

Moderating an online community can be tricky. While social media moderation is necessary, it needs to be done with as light of a touch as possible. The key to effectively managing any given situation is knowing when to step in to moderate a conversation and when you should just let nature take its course, so to speak. As Justin mentioned in this week’s lecture, social media sites, ultimately, belong to their users not to their community managers. According to NPR’s Ethics Handbook, “we do not impose ourselves on such sites. We are guests and behave as such.” In order to get the most out of social media, we need to understand these communities and treat those we encounter online, regardless of whether what they’re saying is positive or negative, with the utmost respect and courtesy that we’d show people we encounter offline.

This week, we’ve been tasked with moderating the following sample customer comments. We are to assume that they were left on our company’s Facebook page.

To a hotel: “I am disgusted about the state of your restaurant on 1467 Justin Kings Way. Empty tables weren’t cleared and full of remains of meals. It makes me wonder what the state of your kitchen is?!!! Gross.”

My response: Hello, (Insert customer name here). Thank you for taking the time to provide us your feedback. We are sorry to hear about your unpleasant dining experience at our restaurant. At (Insert name of restaurant), we pride ourselves on excellent service, one-of-a-kind cuisine and cleanliness. Messy tables are not acceptable. Please be assured that we have spoken with our staff to ensure that this will be not happen again. I’d like to personally invite you to try our restaurant again the next time you’re in our neck of the woods. When you come, please make sure to ask for Lynette. I would love to meet you in person.

To a mainstream news network: “Your reporting on the Middle East is biased in the extreme. You gave almost all your air time to spokespeople for the Israelis last night and there was no right to reply for the Palestinians. The conflict upsets me so much and your reporting of it, saddens me even more and makes me f**king furious.” (Let us assume the reporting was balanced, with equal time to both sides.)

My response: Hello, (Insert customer name here). Thank you for taking the time to listen to our news segment about the Middle East and provide us with your feedback. At (Insert name of mainstream news network), we do our best to ensure that our reporting is as balanced as possible, making sure we give equal air time to both sides of every issue we discuss on our network. Please know that we value your feedback and have passed your comments on to our team manager. If you have additional feedback in the future, please feel free to email us directly at (Insert email address here).

Although each of my replies were for different types of situations, I structured them very similarly. In each, I thanked the customer for their feedback, apologized for the poor experience they had, touched on our company’s values and invited them to leave additional feedback. While there is no magic formula for moderating comments on social media, I find that this way is a pretty standard and effective way to handle customer/viewer complaints, as it demonstrates empathy and honesty.

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FedEx’s Social Media Nightmare Before Christmas

Contrary to popular belief, not all publicity is good publicity. While it’s good to have people talking about you, a negative comment on social media has the power to quickly damage your brand’s reputation.

Before Social Media

Prior to social media marketing, companies had time to react to situations that called for crisis management. For instance, they could pull their TV commercial or retract an entire newspaper article if they felt it was being poorly received without much backlash. Sure, people could record these commercials or save these articles, but there really was no way for them to quickly share this information with others.

Social media, however, makes things more permanent, and is therefore, harder for companies to control. All it takes is for one of your customers to take a screenshot of something you posted or upload an incriminating video and then share it with their followers to make your social media faux pas go viral.

FedEx’s Blunder

In Dec. 2011, FedEx came under social media attack after YouTube user goobie55 uploaded a video that showed a FedEx delivery man throwing the Samsung computer monitor he ordered over his fence to deliver it to him. Although the customer was home at the time, the delivery driver never bothered to knock or ring the doorbell to alert him of his package; instead, he chose to toss it. After opening his monitor, the customer noticed that it was broken and needed to be replaced. Thanks to his well-placed security security camera, he was able to express his disappointment with FedEx on YouTube. Goobie55’s video, which received more than one million views in an approximately 24-hour time span, prompted other FedEx customers to discuss their negative experiences with the Memphis-based shipping company.

It was time for FedEx to do some damage control.

FedEx Responds

After the video was posted, FedEx Senior Communications Specialist Shea Leordeanu stated “All of us here at FedEx have seen the video and quite frankly we were shocked.” Two days later, on Dec. 21, FedEx apologized via their own YouTube video. In it, Senior Vice President of U.S. Operations Matthew Thornton apologized on behalf of his entire company for the actions of their reckless delivery driver. “I am upset and embarrassed for our customer’s poor experience,” he said. Thornton went on to explain that they had met with the customer, who had accepted the company’s apology and is now satisfied. They also announced that they were taking disciplinary action against the driver.

While this video went against FedEx’s purple promise, which is to make every FedEx experience outstanding, the company decided to use it as a learning opportunity. They shared the video internally to remind their employees of the importance of delivering packages and to demonstrate that actions like this are totally unacceptable. They also incorporated it into their training programs “as a constant reminder of the importance of earning — and keeping — your trust with every single delivery.” Additionally, the FedEx communications team also wrote a blog post titled, “Absolutely, Positively Unacceptable,” to expand on their apology video.

My Take On It

I actually really liked the way FedEx handled its negative publicity. The company took note of the viral video; issued a sincere, well-written apology, both on YouTube and on its site’s blog, in which it stated that it would use this video to prevent future incidents; made sure the customer whose monitor was damaged was satisfied; and announced that it would be taking disciplinary action against the reckless delivery driver. Customers took note of the company’s response and voiced their approval of the way it handled things in the blog comments.

That being said, there are a few things I would’ve done differently. First of all, while I appreciated FedEx’s response, I felt that it was too delayed. The video was posted on Dec. 19, and it wasn’t until Dec. 21 that FedEx issued their official apology. In the social media world, two days can seem like an eternity. Additionally, while the negative publicity took place on YouTube, I would’ve liked to have seen the company post a short apology to their Twitter as well as share a link to their YouTube video and blog post on their Facebook wall, as this would’ve increased the changes of having their message reach as many FedEx customers as possible. Finally, I wasn’t able to find any follow-up articles from FedEx about how this video had changed the way they do business. So even though they said they were going to incorporate it in their training programs, I would’ve liked to have seen a follow-up blog post about how doing so had had a positive impact on their employees and the company overall.

I Trust You, Rand Fishkin

Trusting people on social media can be a tricky thing. In face-to-face conversations, it’s much easier to gauge a person’s trustworthiness than when they’re hiding behind a computer screen. Although I tend to trust too easily in life, it takes a special type of person to earn my trust on social media.

Rand Fishkin

If you were to poll everyone at the Internet marketing company I work for and ask them who they trust most on social media, they would be unanimous with their answer – Rand Fishkin. Rand is the founder of Moz, a Seattle-based company that sells inbound marketing and marketing analytics software subscriptions. And on top of that, he follows Steve Rayson’s proposed social media trust formula to a tee.

With that in mind, it’s time to evaluate his trustworthiness.

Social Media Trust Formula

A is for Authority – In the Internet marketing world, Moz is king when it comes to SEO. Being that we always want to stay on our toes when it comes to Google, Rand is the perfect person to follow on social media. Every Friday, he puts out a short, educational video on his website called “Whiteboard Friday” that touches on a new SEO topic. In it, he provides tips and best practices. His videos are funny, laid back and usually no more than 10-12 minutes long. In case you missed something he said in the video, but don’t have time to rewatch it, you can read the transcript right below the actual video. He also frequently blogs about current SEO issues on his website.

On his Facebook and Twitter, Rand is just as knowledgeable, often providing his fans and followers with the latest in SEO and Google. He currently has 10,779 likes on his Facebook business page and 226,000 followers on Twitter, so it seems that others have taken notice of his vast knowledge in the Internet marketing arena.

H is for Helpfulness – No matter how busy he seems to be, Rand always finds the time to be helpful. In addition to putting out a new “Whiteboard Friday” video each week to educate his followers, I’ve also seen him write back to people in the comments section of his site, respond to comments left on his Facebook posts and reply to his followers tweets. Up until January of last year, he was the CEO of Moz. How many CEOs have you seen that actually take the time to respond to user comments on their blog posts? I’d venture to say not many. While Rand could simply just say something along the lines of “Thank you for commenting,” he, instead, writes a detailed response that shows that he actually read the person’s comment. Additionally, Rand isn’t just partial to Moz.com. On his social media channels, you’ll see him promote information from all types of sites. As long as he finds a piece of information useful, he’ll share it, no matter where it originated.

I is for Intimacy – Rand doesn’t pretend to be perfect, which makes me respect him even more. Earlier this month, he wrote a blog post that really stood out to me called, “On Being Wrong and Not Knowing the Answer.” In it, Rand is not only intimate with his fans but also honest and sincere (genuine), which are two of the characteristics I believe a trustworthy person should possess.

“Not having answers is natural. Not having a certain type of experience or enough of that experience to make a smart-than-average guess is going to happen, even if you’re the most coveted, respected expert in your field. It’s what you DO when you don’t have that answer that separates the high-integrity experts from the rest of the pack.”

Just because Rand is an SEO guru, doesn’t mean he knows all or that he doesn’t need to seek advice from other trustworthy people. It’s nice to see someone be so intimate with his fans. If only other high-level executives could learn from Rand’s humility.

SP is for Self Promotion – Rand likes to share his experiences with others who could learn from them or might even be able to relate to them, but one thing he doesn’t like to do is make things all about him. In his most recent blog post, “The False Narratives We Tell Ourselves,” he explains that he’s not “sharing this for sympathy.” He’s sharing it because he thinks ” we all carry these false narratives with us.” In other words, if Rand feels that someone will be able to benefit from him sharing something about himself, he will. Otherwise, he’s very humble and low key.

From what I’ve come to know of Rand ever since my company encouraged that I follow him on Twitter, I’d say that his No. 1 priority is teaching people, be it through his blog, his Twitter or his Facebook. To Rand, gaining his followers’ trust validates what he’s doing.

Instagram’s Terms and Conditions – An Inside Look

Instagram Logo

In December, Instagram, the Facebook-owned mobile photo and video-sharing social media platform, hit 300 million active monthly users. Forty-one percent of these users are between the ages of 16-24. Do you think people in this age group are taking the time to read through their favorite app’s terms and conditions? Probably not.

Generally speaking, Ts and Cs tend to be extremely long and difficult to understand due to their excessive legal jargon. But combing through them would give social media users a breakdown of what they’re getting themselves into. How does Instagram promise to keep its users safe? Are there any risks involved with having an Instagram account? Are the terms ethically sound? I’ve decided to take a closer look at Instagram’s Terms of Use to see if there are any potential ethical problems.

Instagram Terms and Conditions

The first thing that caught my eye was that users must be 13 or older. Can you imagine a 13-year-old trying to understand Instagram’s Ts & Cs? Because Instagram’s average user tends to be on the younger side, it’s even more important that its terms be written in plain English. In fact, since Instagram is often referred to as the “cooler” Facebook, it should have a “cool” terms and conditions section, filled with witty humor, images and an easy-to-navigate format, such as is the case with Facebook’s privacy basics page.

“You must not create or submit unwanted email, comments, likes or other forms of commercial or harassing communications (a/k/a “spam”) to any Instagram users.” While this rule is clearly spelled out in Instagram’s Ts & Cs, I see it broken every day by users who leave spam comments on celebrity photos. What is Instagram doing to reduce the number of times this happens? Are they terminating these users’ accounts like they say they will?

Kylie Jenner Instagram

I think the part that most sticks out to me is Instagram’s rule about not abusing, stalking or bullying other users. In its Ts & Cs, Instagram only spells out what users can’t do but not what it will do to help combat the bullying and abuse that occurs on its platform. The closest it comes to providing some sort of solution is on its Abuse & Spam page, where it recommends that users report such behavior using the app’s built-in reporting features. But how does this give users peace of mind that their issue will be resolved, especially when its Ts & Cs note that “”Instagram does not have any obligation to prescreen, monitor, edit, or remove any Content?” As I mentioned in my reading reaction this week, safety is a two-way street. Users signing up for Instagram want to be rest assured that, if they abide by all of the platform’s rules, they will be well taken care, should an issue arise.

In my opinion, the statement that could use the most improvement is the one that says that Instagram has the right to change its Terms of Use from time to time and notify you of the Updated Terms by posting them on the Service. Isn’t a lack of clearly communicating its Ts & Cs what got Instagram all of that negative press two years ago? I think Instagram could benefit from notifying users of term changes via a blog post or an email announcement.

After reviewing its online documents, what I liked more than Instagram’s Ts & Cs was its Community Guidelines document, which clearly and concisely spelled out what users can and can’t do as well as additional things they should keep in mind.

Hello, everyone, and hello, 2015!

Hello! My name is Lynette Zilio, and I’m in my fourth semester of the University of Florida’s social media master’s program. I’m so happy to be in class with some familiar (and some new) faces! For those of you who might not know me, I’d like to take this time to tell you a little bit about myself.

Although I currently live in Orlando, I was born and raised in Miami. In 2007, I moved to Gainesville to attend UF. (Go Gators!) There, I majored in journalism and minored in Spanish. Throughout my time at UF, I was able to intern for The Miami Herald and The Denver Post as well as contribute to The Independent Florida Alligator and INsite, an entertainment magazine. I was also fortunate enough to be able to spend a semester abroad in Madrid, Spain, which really helped me dive deeper into the Spanish culture.

After I graduated from UF in 2011, I accepted a position as a sales and marketing assistant for a wholesale designer handbag company. In this role, I served as the liaison between the company’s independent sales representatives and its more than 1,000 specialty store accounts. I also ensured all department store orders were correct, attended trade shows, updated the website with new products and product descriptions, and created and managed the company’s social media profiles.

A year-and-a-half later, I accepted a position as the junior SEO specialist for a Miami-based cloud-computing company and Google Partner. In this role, I learned about keyword research, on-page optimization and what makes Google tick. I was also in charge of creating and managing the company’s various social media profiles as well as writing weekly blog entries for the company’s site.

Last June, after almost five years of being in a long-distance relationship, I decided to make the move to Orlando to be in the same city as my boyfriend. Since then, I’ve been working as a link builder for an Internet-marketing company called Launch That. Although the company manages several different websites, my job is to increase the visibility of asbestos.com in Google by utilizing white-hat SEO tactics to obtain authoritative and relevant backlinks. I also write monthly blog posts for the site and help with some of the company’s social media efforts.

My boyfriend Chris and I at the Launch That Christmas Party!

My boyfriend Chris and I at the Launch That Christmas Party!

In my spare time, I enjoy traveling, trying new restaurants and dancing.

Being that I was self-taught before entering this master’s program, I don’t quite know all of the ‘fine print’ of social media. With the help of this course, I’d like to be able to learn more about how to properly handle social media issues in the workplace, what the terms and conditions of each platform really mean, how to best moderate user comments and how to determine the validity of content shared via social media. Once I learn more about social media ethics, I know that I will feel more confident in my role as an Internet marketer.

Proposed Integrated Marketing Communications Plan: BullHorn Media

**NOTE: The following proposal was created for BullHorn Media as part of my final project for MMC 5006, a graduate school course.

Amplify-Your-Video-Bullhorn_900x295

Some Background Information

Orlando-based multimedia production company BullHorn Media is looking for assistance to help generate buzz about their new brand through content, SEO, social media and networking events, to name a few. Below, I have proposed an integrated marketing communications plan that they will be able to utilize to help promote this new brand.

Company Analysis

BullHorn Media is a multimedia production company based in Orlando, Fla. It is the brainchild of Mark and Lisa LeGrand of Pro One Video Productions, which has been a leading video production company in Central Florida since 1992. Mark and Lisa had originally been doing both corporate events and weddings through Pro One but branched off and created BullHorn Media last year to specifically tend to its corporate clientele. This new multimedia production company offers its customers the following services: video production, graphic design and photography.

Target Audience

BullHorn Media produces videos for small and large corporate and nonprofit clients. So far, Mark and Lisa have been servicing companies that need profile pieces and web videos and documenting large conventions and seminars that are being held in the Central Florida area. They have worked with such high-profiles clients as Google, Hewlett-Packard, Pepsi and Gatorade. BullHorn Media also offers photography services, such as on-site headshots and product images, and graphic design services, such as branding, Photoshop and motion graphics.

Event Video Production

Strengths and Opportunities

  • Strengths: BullHorn Media’s biggest asset is the way it treats its clients. While there are many other companies that can produce high-quality videos, Mark and Lisa set themselves apart from the rest by listening to their clients’ desires and treating them in a friendly manner. Unlike some of their competitors, they also do on-site editing at conferences, which their clients really appreciate.
  • Opportunities:

Orange County Convention Center Pictured: Orange County Convention Center

  • Orlando welcomed 57 million visitors last year. About half of all visitors to Orlando came from elsewhere in Florida. An additional 7 percent came from other countries, while the rest were from other parts of the U.S.
  • In July 2014, Forbes ranked the Greater Orlando area #67 among the best places for business and careers.
  • Given that 90 percent of their clients contact them through email, I believe BullHorn Media could benefit from utilizing a service such as MailChimp to send out biweekly email marketing campaigns to its current customers. The email marketing service could also serve as a means to attract new customers and keep an organized list of their customers’ email addresses.
  • By signing up for and maintaining additional social media platforms, besides Facebook, BullHorn Media could engage and inform its target audience.
  • By attending networking events in their field, BullHorn Media will be able to form lasting relationships with potential clients.

The Importance of an IMC strategy

Having an integrated marketing communications plan using various multimedia channels is the best way to reach your customers. According to a recent Houston Chronicle article, by integrating tools such as advertising, direct mail, social media, telemarketing and sales promotion, you provide clarity, consistency and maximum communications impact. In other words, having a presence on multiple social media platforms and review sites and relying on email marketing and traditional marketing channels allows you to reach and engage with as many customers as possible.

Overall IMC Goals

  • Increase traffic to bullhorn-media.com
  • Incorporate social media into the brand’s overall IMC strategy

Final Thoughts

An integrated marketing communications strategy takes advantage of a combination of various communications tools to spread a brand’s message. While each platform serves its own purpose, the main reason for relying on an IMC plan is to have the greatest possible chance of reaching as many customers as possible at once. If implemented, my proposed IMC plan for BullHorn Media will help the company reach their goals of increasing traffic to their website and implementing a social media plan. In the long run, an IMC plan, such as this one, combined with their innate client relations skills, will help BullHorn Media stay ahead of its competitors. 

Social Media Analytics and Why They Matter

DISCLAIMER: Please note that I do not work for ABC company nor am I affiliated with them in any way. The following blog post is for academic purposes only.

While regularly posting to your company’s social media profiles is extremely important, this means nothing if your posts aren’t performing well. How do you measure the impact and effectiveness of your social media initiatives? How can you tell if your posts are driving business or whether they’re receiving a lot of fan interaction? This is where analytics comes in. According to Social Media Today, social analytics aggregates and analyzes online conversations and social activity generated across social channels and enables organizations to act on the derived intelligence to drive business results. In other words, analytics provides you with concrete data to help you determine if you’re on the right track with your social media business model.

Below, I will be taking a look at the Facebook and email analytics for ABC company, a health-oriented business in the Central Florida area. The company has a Facebook page, shown below, a Twitter account, a Pinterest page and a YouTube channel. ABC company also sends out a bi-weekly e-newsletter through Bronto Software, which provides a cloud-based marketing platform for retailers to drive revenue through their email, mobile and social campaigns.

Facebook Insights

Facebook Insights is the platform’s free built-in analytics package. It helps your company make sense of its social media analytics and lets you see how each individual piece of content is connecting with your audience. Using Facebook Insights, your company can see how well certain types of content, including photos, videos, links, and questions, perform in comparison with each other. I will be analyzing the Facebook analytics for ABC company so that I can see what they’re doing well and what needs improvement.

Overview

Screen Shot 2014-08-01 at 5.33.18 PM

As you take a look at the above image taken from ABC company’s Facebook page, you can see that the page has received a total of 880 likes, which is a 69 percent increase from the previous time period. This shows that ABC company is doing well in terms of generating page likes. From a marketing perspective, a Facebook like can be the most powerful tool Facebook has to offer. Every time someone “Likes” your page or something on it, he or she exposes it to all their friends, who then have the opportunity to expose it to their friends. In addition, 340,325 friends of fans liked ABC company fan page, which was a 1.31 percent increase. While the company should be happy that it saw an increase in this area, I think it needs to do a better job of attracting friends of their current fans to ensure that this number will be higher in the future. During this time, ABC company had 46 people talking about them, which refers to the number of people who liked, commented or shared their content. Unfortunately, this was a 50.54 percent decrease. Based on this information, it looks like ABC company needs to do a better job of engaging its customers through more interesting posts. Finally, ABC company had a weekly total reach of 5,740, which was an almost 40 percent increase from the week before. In Facebook terms, reach refers to the number of people who have seen your posts. Based on this information, it appears that while lots of people are seeing ABC company’s posts, they are opting not to interact with them. Lets find out why.

On ABC company’s overview page, you can see a breakdown of how each of their posts from May 27-June 2 performed. Facebook Insights provides the reach; the number of engaged users, or the number of people who click on your posts; the number of people who are talking about a specific post; and the virality of a post, or the percentage of people who have created a story from your Page post out of the total number of unique people who have seen it. In other words, the more people engage with your content in relation to how many unique people have seen it determines a particular post’s virality. In the post types section, you can see that the post with the highest level of engagement, which was sent out on May 29, reached 509 people, had 13 users engaged, 10 people talking about it and a virality of 1.96 percent. The post with the highest virality was the National Cancer Survivors Day post the company sent out on June 2. The timeliness of this post was likely the reason behind this.

Reach

Screen Shot 2014-08-01 at 5.33.41 PM

ABC company’s target audience on Facebook is in the 25-24 age range with the majority, 28.6 percent being females. More than 5,100 of these fans live in the United States and the majority live in Orlando, which makes sense because this is where ABC company is based. English is the primary language of those logging on, but based on this information provided, fans in Spanish speaking countries seem to also be taking an interesting the company’s Facebook posts.

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In terms of reach, ABC company seems to be performing better with viral posts than with organic and paid ones.

Talking About This

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ABC Company saw a decrease in the number of people who were talking about the company on April 28 and those who were talking about it on June 2. But the company does seem to be making improvements in this area. After all, their June 2 post was the one that had the most virality.

Bronto

Screen Shot 2014-08-01 at 5.37.05 PM

 

The above screenshot shows the analytics for an e-newsletter ABC company sent out on May 21. According to this report, the company sent this newsletter to 2,624 people. 2,606 people received the email, meaning that there were only 18 bounce backs. Eighteen out of about 2,600 isn’t bad at all, so it seems that ABC company does a good job of keeping up with its customer contact list. That being said, the e-newsletter email could’ve been stronger. Only 661 people opened the email, and 72 of these clicked on it. Unfortunately, none of these people were conversions, and only one forwarded the newsletter to a friend.

There’s always room for improvement

  • While ABC company currently has a steady number of page views, it’s falling behind in terms of attracting unique visitors to its site. My suggestion would be to make its posts more engaging. While regular status/text posts can be useful, posts of images and even links to an original, high-quality blog article would generate traffic.
  • Given that most of the company’s traffic is coming from Google, I would recommend that they increase their SEO efforts if they aren’t doing so already. ABC company needs to determine the most appropriate short-tail and long-tail keywords and optimize its site for these words. This would be a great way for them to drive traffic, specifically unique visitors, to their site.
  • Because females ages 25-34 seem to make up the majority of the page’s traffic, ABC company should try to appeal more to the emotional side of things as well as to health issues that are specifically related to females.
  • Timely posts with mass appeal, such as the one ABC company sent out on June 2 about National Cancer Survivors Day, are more along the lines of the type of posts they need to be sending out, as these seem to be best received by their followers.
  • Given that most of its followers are in Orlando, perhaps ABC company could post about specific health concerns that people in the Orlando area might face, be it something as minor as alerting residents of pollen season or something as serious as heart disease or cancer.
  • In terms of email campaigns, perhaps ABC company could improve its subject line to entice more people to open up these emails. It could also use eye-catching images and be succinct in terms of the length of the text in their emails to convince people to click.

Other channels

ABC company could cross promote in order to increase user engagement and unique visitors to its site. I would recommend that it upload informative, health-related videos to YouTube at least once a week as well as upload eye-catching images to its Pinterest. I think its fans/clients would enjoy seeing infographics that simplify complicated health statistics. Finally, ABC company could utilize hashtags on Twitter to promote discussions, host live Q&A sessions, in which it could answer questions about health concerns people might have, and hold contests.

Future Campaigns and Posts

As I just mentioned, I think the Twitter Q&A sessions would do really well for ABC company. In terms of Facebook, I would recommend that ABC company incorporate more images into its posts and even post daily health facts to educate its followers. The facts could be structured as “Did you know”? posts. In terms of email campaigns, perhaps the company could add a “Sign up for our newsletter” button to its homepage, utilize more effective subject lines, such as “What you need to know about your health this month” and add infographics to the body of its email to instantly draw people in and encourage them to click any links they might’ve included in their email.